What I want you to know about serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer

What I Want You to Know is a series of reader submissions. It is an attempt to allow people to tell their personal stories, in the hopes of bringing greater compassion to the unique issues each of us face. If you would like to submit a story to this series, click here. Today’s guest post was submitted by Mary.

I’ve always wanted to be a Peace Corps Volunteer (PCV). As a child, high-schooler, university student I daydreamed about living in a rustic hut with a dirt floor, waking up and watching the sun rise over a foggy mountain through my mosquito net. Obviously, I knew it would be hard: I hate the heat, I hate big bugs, and I’d miss my friends and family. Peace Corps and PCVs always warn against having expectations… but I was sure I could handle anything. Pooping in a hole? No problem. Walking ten miles a day? NBD. No peanut butter? I’ll survive.

I was so confident that I’d be able to make the best of any situation. That I would love the language I’d learn (or, rather, get to perfect my Spanish after ten years of study). That I’d love the culture, the people, the change…wherever I ended up.

Everything I was so confident about? JK LOL.

In reality, I hate the country I’m living in. The language is difficult. I love learning languages and actually am pretty good at the local one…but it’s ugly. The food is boring and unhealthy. The music makes me want to stab my eardrums with pencils. The people are very nice – but too nice. My co-worker calls me at least ten times a day and must be touching me at all times. The majority of men here are misogynist narcissists who think women exist solely for their objectification and to support the patriarchy. There is no beauty in the landscape, there is no art, and, to rub salt in the wound, I’m in the only city in the country without historic buildings or churches or ruins.

And I can’t complain about it. I can’t blog about it, and run the risk of a local reading it. I can’t insult the country as a representative of the United States. And I certainly can’t back out of my commitment here, because I’d lose all self-respect.

There are things I like. The fruits and vegetables and coffee. The old men in fedoras on bicycles. The nightly walks everyone takes around the city. I’ll eventually get something finished here, and my overbearing coworker at least has a heart for work.

But it is so demoralizing. I’m depressed, lonely, and bored. I had a wonderful life and friends back in the States, so why did I throw it all away?

I remind myself that these two years will be good for me, time to heal from past trauma; good for my family and for my little sister to become more independent; good for my new city, if I can actually make a difference. I know in the future I’ll look back on this exam-free, independent, self-defining time fondly.

But right now? It sucks. I want to go home. And I have two more years to go.


Source Link: What I want you to know about serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer


Original Source of this article: Ruth Davis’ OC Blog , https://ruthrdavisblog.wordpress.com

Wednesday’s Child: Meet Nathan

Every Wednesday I feature a child recently highlighted by a local Wednesday’s Child newscast to share the stories of children from around the country who are waiting for a family. My hope is that this can broaden exposure for the children highlighted, but also serve as a reminder that these children represent thousands of children currently in the foster-care system. Perhaps their stories will inspire you to consider opening your home to a child needing a family. For more information and to learn about other waiting children, visit AdoptUsKids.


Source Link: Wednesday’s Child: Meet Nathan


Original Source of this article: Ruth Davis’ OC Blog , https://ruthrdavisblog.wordpress.com

Writing the Perfect Customer Service Résumé Is Easier Than You Think https://t.co/9T3H95SNtw #cutomerservice https://t.co/wHENfv3o8B

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from Twitter https://twitter.com/PCNanswers


Original Source of this article: Ruth Davis’ OC Blog , https://ruthrdavisblog.wordpress.com

Clothing subscription box showdown! Stitch Fix vs. Trunk Club vs. LeTote

Clothing subscription box showdown! Stitchfix vs. Trunk Club vs. LeTote. I’m sharing boxes from each brand, and talking about the pros and cons. An honest look at what I like and don’t like about each service.

bit.ly/getletote
bit.ly/50offtrunkclub
bit.ly/yaystitchfix


Source Link: Clothing subscription box showdown! Stitch Fix vs. Trunk Club vs. LeTote


Original Source of this article: Ruth Davis’ OC Blog , https://ruthrdavisblog.wordpress.com

What I want you to know about talking about suicide

What I Want You to Know is a series of reader submissions. It is an attempt to allow people to tell their personal stories, in the hopes of bringing greater compassion to the unique issues each of us face. If you would like to submit a story to this series, click here. Today’s guest post was submitted by The Advicist.

Suicide isn’t something most of us want to think about, let alone talk about. I get that. I used to be the same.  But then I had some training in talking with people about suicidal feelings, and had to put that training to use. I’m sorry that I did. But it taught me one very important thing: Talking about it doesn’t make it more real, or more scary. Talking about it makes it seem smaller, less threatening.
I think people don’t want to talk about suicide for a few reasons:
  • If you don’t talk about it, you can pretend it doesn’t exist.
  • The feelings! So many feelings! It’s much easier to brush them under the rug than face them (in ourselves and others).
  • And when it comes to talking to someone with depression, you don’t want to put ideas into their head.
Well, I’m here to tell you that you cannot make a person consider suicide by asking them if they feel that way.  And yes, by asking them, I do mean saying something simple along the lines of, ‘Have you had suicidal thoughts?’.
It seems like a shocking thing to say. That just by saying it, you might somehow encourage someone to do it. But experience has taught me that it’s quite the opposite. Having someone ask about it finally gives them permission to talk about it. The relief is palpable. The sigh. The release of keeping those thoughts bottled up for so long. Of feeling utterly terrible and hopeless, and then ON TOP OF THAT, feeling that those very feelings are somehow wrong.
If you know someone who is struggling, don’t be afraid to talk about it. Ask them how they are. Be prepared to just listen. And if someone hasn’t been having thoughts of suicide, they haven’t. You are not going to give them ideas.
Don’t offer solutions (other than urging them to seek help). Don’t tell them to buck up, or cheer up, or that ‘it isn’t that bad!’.
Don’t argue with their reasoning, or list reasons to stay alive. They likely won’t believe your reasons. And telling someone who feels that their family doesn’t care that their family will miss them, for example, will only make them feel worse.
Just listen. And let them know that you are there for them, and prepared to accept them and ALL their feelings, even the ones that -we- would rather weren’t there.
The feelings exist. Suicide exists. And not talking about it only makes it worse.


Source Link: What I want you to know about talking about suicide


Original Source of this article: Ruth Davis’ OC Blog , https://ruthrdavisblog.wordpress.com